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This topic contains 42 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by avatar Tony Roberts 3 months, 3 weeks ago.

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January 22, 2019 at 4:41 am #2782
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Bertin
Member

All of the ebooks available on Amazon? Even the ones that don’t have your name? I just bought The Eternal Mercenary ebook from Amazon Japan.

January 22, 2019 at 10:50 am #2783
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Tony Roberts
Keymaster

Yes, they all are except for 23-24 by Paul Dengelegi, those are not available as he did not enter into any agreement with the publishers about having them on kindle, and also 29 and 33 which were removed from the series (Michael B. Goodwin’s two casca tales) which were plagiarised and there would have been a lawsuit so they were expunged from the series.

January 22, 2019 at 11:39 am #2784
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Bertin
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Ah. I’d read about the Goodwin’s tales on the Wiki entry. Wish that hadn’t happened. I will gradually purchase all of the stories that I can, in ebook form. 4 is quite good. 5 is just going to have to wait. When do I get to the ones you specifically wrote?

January 22, 2019 at 11:57 am #2785
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Tony Roberts
Keymaster

Well, the whole thing was regrettable but when you steal entire passages form Rambo and have the author of that story leaping up and down, you can’t blame the franchise in removing it.

My stories begin at number 25 and go onwards. So if you’re reading it in chronological order, you’ll read 37 Roman Mercenary first, immediately after reading Casca 7 The Damned.

Panzer soldier is good I agree.

January 24, 2019 at 12:19 pm #2786
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Bertin
Member

Panzer Soldier is a fantastic story. I’m closer to the end. Casca is roaming Berlin, trying to save people.

I’ve developed over recent years a strong anti-omniscient reaction. I’m having it to the Brotherhood in this tale, because I really loathe the amount of power they have. Sadly, I suppose I can look forward to more of this in the other books. I’ll live.

There is an element of the story-telling, especially while he was still with his squad, that I used in a fanfic I once wrote. Telling what was going on in the general history of the event, and coming back to what was happening with the main characters. Nowhere near as well as Sadler did it in this book, of course, but it’s sort of comforting to see the same style.

January 24, 2019 at 1:37 pm #2787
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Tony Roberts
Keymaster

I think Sadler or whoever invented the Brotherhood wanted an adversary that was ‘immortal’ like him so they could be at one another’s throats throughout history, and therefore created an organisation rather than a person.

It is big and powerful but it will be interesting to see how Casca deals with them as and when necessary. I’ll leave that for you to discover.

January 26, 2019 at 2:29 pm #2789
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Bertin
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I’ve just started The Persian audiobook. My library tells me they buy the official books and restrict borrowing to a person per copy. I’m going to buy an ebook every month.

In reading The Barbarian, I thought the implication is that Lida is the reincarnation of Neda.

January 26, 2019 at 5:04 pm #2790
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Tony Roberts
Keymaster

I’m not convinced myself that Lida is the reincarnation of Neda. I know that Casca yearns for Lida most of all in his time in other Sadler books, rather than Neda, so it would seem to me that Lida was a completely new person rather than a reincarnation.

January 26, 2019 at 7:08 pm #2791
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Bertin
Member

Indeed! Of course, Casca had about four decades with Leda. He stayed with her until she passed away. I think he had less than half that with Neda, and he had to leave her. So to me it makes sense that he would yearn for Lida rather than for Neda.

When Lida said the words that he’d written in his farewell note to Neda, that’s where I wondered if Sadler intended them to be the same soul.

January 27, 2019 at 11:08 am #2792
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Tony Roberts
Keymaster

Not sure, but I think the initial success of the series caught him by surprise and he had to rethink his character’s life story. That’s why sometimes the start doesn’t match up with later events, at least to my mind. Two different places for example where he enlisted into the legion. Still, only a fanatic like myself would have picked that up.

January 28, 2019 at 2:58 pm #2793
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Bertin
Member

I can understand that! I’m only as far as The Persian now, so I have little to draw from for the whole of the series.

*rubs eyes* I’m up to the part where the head of the Brotherhood is reading out their mission statement. Just out of curiosity, is there any hope that someday we find out that this guy was actually Satan in disguise?

A bit back I read Paradise Lost. Aside from the ugliness of pretty much anything to do with women in that book, I kept twigging to the statements that God knows everything. Knows what is going to happen, and why. And yet still insists to Jesus that everyone has free will. A choice that isn’t a choice.

So I wonder if Jesus made Casca an immortal being as an effect of knowing he would make Casca an immortal being… Perhaps to Jesus, Casca is his ally to save mankind from the evils of the deranged Brotherhood of the Lamb.

January 28, 2019 at 3:36 pm #2794
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Tony Roberts
Keymaster

Satan – no. The Brotherhood was founded only after Jesus was executed so he didn’t create Casca as a kind of foil to the BoL. Izram just did his own thing after he saw Casca run Jesus through.

January 28, 2019 at 3:53 pm #2795
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Bertin
Member

Thank you. I’m a bit worried about annoying you with all my comments.

It’s just that Izram’s own thing seems more than a thousand years too early with the bit about Aryans having infiltrated the Hebrews so Jesus is really Aryan.

January 28, 2019 at 3:57 pm #2796
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Tony Roberts
Keymaster

Don’t be worried – this is what the forum is for, after all. I think the Book of Izram states Jesus’ origins in The Persian. I touched a little more on that in Casca 28 The Avenger.

January 29, 2019 at 12:02 pm #2801
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Bertin
Member

Finished The Persian! I was impressed with who the head of the order turned out to be because of course I had no idea until we were shown, and deeply puzzled as to how the vasir made it into power in the first place, while at the same time being a generational member of the Brotherhood.

Question: Does Casca know now who the leader of the time really was? Was this information included in what Goldman relived? Or is it only we, the readers of the books, who know?

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